April 2014

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beef cheeks

Yes truffles are expensive but, you know what’s cheap, gravel. You can buy a bunch of that shit for much $s. And while I’m at it, who (over 6) doesn’t try something because they think they won’t like.

Beef cheeks were the first thing up. Courtesy of Warren Pensini’s Blackwood Valley Beef – pasture-raised cows that feed in the slowly rotational pattern of shifting grazing areas. Lovingly raised, easily cooked. Pretty much your standard braise.

  1. Trim the cheeks of excess fat and skin, season well, and brown in a casserole dish.
  2. Soften the mirepoix – chunky cuts of leek, celery, onion and carrot.
  3. Return the beef to the mirepoix. 
  4. Add whatever you don’t want to drink out of a bottle of dry red at 10am in the morning. A cup of homemade chicken stock and top up with water.
  5. Add a few bay leaves and I shaved in some Willy’s pure cacao.
  6. Bring to a boil. Scrape off any scum on the surface, cover with baking paper, place the lid on top, and pop in a 110C oven all day.

You’ll know when it’s done because the meat will have turned from tough muscle (when it’s browning, it smells a bit of offal) to beautiful forky-flakey bits of meat.

Keep your cheeks warm. Strain the cooking liquor and reduce down to taste. Add some chopped truffle when it’s done and stir through.

Serve with very creamy made-with-milk polenta with some truffle mixed through. Shave some truffle on top.

http://italianfood.about.com/od/cheesedishes/r/blr0867.htm

http://www.gourmettraveller.com.au/recipes/recipe-search/fare-exchange/2013/4/hazelnut-mousse-with-honeycomb-and-chocolate/

 

truffle

pork fillet

 

cavello negro

Stuffed Pork Loin

pork filletThey are tiny little things considering they come from a whole pig. I actually think I managed to bags these first over a seen on TV chef from the night before. They’re local Killarra Open Range Pork and like Blackwood Valley Beef, are lovingly raised in Boyup Brook before being dispatched. Stretched out to twelve the two loins would make a ‘taste’ entree and did that perfectly.

Rather than the traditional rolled/stuffed, I forgot my string and had to improvise. A needle and thread was available so it became a a long wound, stuffed with tasty things, and then stitched up. I don;t know if there are any medical procedures that actually require all of this but you can improvise in the field.

  1. Slice along a pork loin making sure you don’t cut through and don’t cut through to either end. This will make a long pocket.
  2. Stuff the pocket with a mix of finely chopped roasted hazelnuts, a little garlic, soft goats cheese, and some chopped truffle.
  3. Stitch it up and rub some truffle mustard around the outside – so it’s covered in flavour rather than coated in mustard.
  4. Sear all round in a hot pan and then finish in an oven pan in a 180C oven with a glass of white wine and some thyme.
  5. When the pork is done. Let the loin rest for a little, while you scrape up the pan and reduce down the wine a little over heat.
  6. Fry up the cavalo nero with some roasted hazelnuts in the browning pan.

Nice fresh firm local potatoes as in potato country, mash, then work some butter and milk through in the pan over heat, stirring. Season with truffle salt and a little finely chopped truffle.

Smear a bit of mash on the plate, top with some cavallo nero and nuts, then top with a slice of the loin (remember to remove the stitches). Top with a little sliced truffle and pour over some of the pan juices.

 

fondue

 

 

beef cheeks and polenta

hazelnut mousse

giant slab of honeycomb

crumb